Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News

SEP15 2017

Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News (GEN) is the world's most widely read biotech publication. It provides the R&D community with critical information on the tools, technologies, and trends that drive the biotech industry.

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Genetic Engineering & Biotechnology News | GENengnews.com | SEPTEMBER 15, 2017 | 21 ally grow the culture before inoculating the final full-capacity production tank. Continuous Process Monitoring with a Virtual Sensor Designing a successful process to produce a particular biologic depends not only on fit- ting together the right cell culture media, cell line, and bioreactor, but also on careful con- trol and monitoring of the system. One of the most relevant parameters used for bioprocess control and monitoring is cell growth. These measurements are typically obtained through manual sampling and off- line cell count or optical density measure- ments during cultivation. However, Wolf- gang Paul, Ph.D., senior scientist and group leader at Roche Innovation Center Munich, Roche Diagnostics, is developing a new ap- proach to allow continuous monitoring of cell growth without manual sampling or the addition of bulky hardware. The method involves a soft sensor, also referred to as a virtual sensor, that can cal- culate cell growth based on data already col- lected: oxygen input, carbon dioxide output, heating and cooling units, pH value, base ad- dition, and agitation speed. The soft sensor uses multiple linear regression and artificial neural network models to relate these data to cell growth. Loosely modeled after neural networks in the brain, artificial neural networks use inter- connected nodes that imitate neurons to pass along information. According to Dr. Paul, the various nonlinear fitting abilities make this machine-learning approach a promising model for generating the type of accurate es- timations needed for their application. "We initiated the development of the soft sensor on small-scale bioreactors, because there are many vessels (mostly single-use bio- reactors) in use with no space for additional hardware sensors," said Dr. Paul. While their initial studies focused on smaller 250-L biore- actors, the soft sensor should, in theory, func- tion independently of bioreactor size. Accord- ing to Dr. Paul the benefits of a non-invasive, continuous monitoring system that can re- duce the need for manual sampling are "very prominent for the small-scale bioreactors," which play an increasingly important role in process development and characterization for manufacturing large-molecule therapeutics. Biologics have transformed the therapeu- tic landscape, and they continue to do so as the emergence of targeted and personalized therapies require even more innovation from the biomanufacturing industry. Manufactur- ers will need more flexible processes that can deliver consistent, high-quality products in less time and at lower cost than ever before to accommodate the growing needs of the industry and ensure process reliability. Automating genomic discovery JUST IMAGINE THE POSSIBILITIES WITH AUTOMATED CRISPR ANALYSIS Fragment Analyzer ™ is the only automated instrument for the analysis of CRISPR/Cas9 gene-editing events. Accelerate your scientific discovery using a streamlined process for easy identification of both individual and pooled gene mutations. More at AATI-US.COM Bioprocessing Manufacturers will need more flexible processes that can deliver consistent, high-quality products in less time and at lower cost than ever before to accommodate the growing needs of the industry and ensure process reliability. Assessing the activity of a living system using metabolomics requires robust, high-throughput analytical systems that can accurately identify metabolites, a comprehensive understanding of biochemical pathways, and exper tise in analytics and biochemistr y to successfully interpret and apply the results. ReptileB488/Getty Images

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